Can life-threatening bacteria spread on school sports equipment? January 20, 2016 13:00

Many think that staph infections are transferred  only by skin-to-skin contact. However, skin bacteria can also be spread by contact on unclean equipment like sweaty football helmets. Such was the case in Florida with Nicole Meyers’ son Noah, who contracted MRSA from a school-issued helmet that had not been properly sanitized. Bacteria and Skin fungus can sit on gear and not only survive, but even grow, especially in warm, humid environments, which is exactly the type of environment Noah was in. With Matguard, you could prevent any fungal diseases occurring on your skin in a number of ways. You could use our disinfectant spray or wet wipes on the gear, thus properly sanitizing it and preventing the spread of any skin problems. Another way would be to use the wet wipes directly on your skin following use of the equipment, essentially giving yourself an antibacterial body wash before even leaving the field. Unfortunately, Noah did not take any actions like these. Want to be him?

 

By Anne McNamara, Ryan Tronier, Via WXYZ Detroit (http://www.wxyz.com/)

DENVER – A Florida family claims their 16-year-old son contracted MRSA from his high-school football helmet, but a pediatric disease specialist says most cases are transferred through skin-to-skin contact.

Nicole Meyers says her son Noah got the deadly bacteria at football practice. In a Facebook post, she says the school’s helmets were not properly sanitized.

Dr. Jason Newland is a pediatrician with Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City. He says transmission is possible.

“I think most likely it came from the skin, got on the helmet and now the helmet is going to look like it because that’s where the abrasions are, but it probably didn’t originate from the helmet,” said Newland…